5 Benefits From Fresh Turmeric Root

Ingredients

5 Benefits From Fresh Turmeric Root

If you’ve ever walked down the spice aisle of an average grocery store, it’s likely that you’ve seen turmeric, the vivid-orange powdered spice, sitting on the shelves. If you’re ever cooked with it, you probably know just have delicious it can be (and just how much it can stain your dishes that beautiful bright color). But before it takes its place in your spice cabinet or crisper (if you’re using the root), where does turmeric come from? And what can it do for you? 


Let’s break down this magical spice and see what it can do for you—get ready to learn about nature’s gold. 

 

What Is Turmeric?


Turmeric, also known by the scientific name
Curcuma longa, is a flowering plant native to South Asia. It belongs to the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. Like ginger, the root (or rhizome, if you want to get fancy) of turmeric is often used in cooking.


While turmeric root is viable for consumption in its own right, turmeric also takes a different, more common form: powder. If you’re vaguely familiar with turmeric as a culinary ingredient, you probably know it in this form—a deep orange powdered spice.


Turmeric powder comes directly from turmeric root. To make the powder, the roots must be boiled in water, dried, and ground into that fine, brightly-colored dust found on so many spice racks. This flavorful powder has a warm, bitter taste, and it’s often added to dishes like curry powder, mustard, cheese, and butter.


While both raw turmeric root and turmeric powder are popular in the culinary world, they play a vital role in other realms, too. More specifically, people use turmeric in the fields of medicine, fabric-dyeing, and skincare. It’s truly a versatile gift to humankind.

 

Turmeric Contains Curcumin


Clearly, the vivid color and flavorful taste of turmeric aren’t the only perks it has to offer. Turmeric is widely used in medicine and skincare because it’s packed full of really good stuff. 


Curcumin, the most prominent active element in turmeric, gives turmeric strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (along with its unique color and taste). These properties are the reason that turmeric is so popular in skincare and beauty—it does amazing things for the skin.


At this point, you may be asking one question: what’s the difference between turmeric root and turmeric powder? Are both forms of turmeric equally beneficial for us? In short, yes—both substances contain Curcumin, which means they both possess those antioxidant, anti-inflammatory abilities.


However, because turmeric is just so versatile and multi-functional, we’re going to focus on just one of its forms: the root. Let’s explore all of the most compelling benefits of fresh turmeric root and the many ways you should take advantage of this potent superfood. 

###CTA###

Benefit One: Adding Flavor 


Let’s begin with one of the most obvious uses of turmeric—adding a delicious flavor to all sorts of dishes. 


Both turmeric powder and fresh turmeric root will add mustardy, gingery taste to any dish, like curry blends. However, turmeric root seems to have the powder beat when it comes to taste. It offers a brighter, stronger flavor than the powdered turmeric from the spice aisle. 


If you’re looking to really emphasize that turmeric flavor in the next meal you prepare, you may want to opt for fresh turmeric root. It’s usually found right next to the ginger in the produce section. If you can’t find it at your regular spot, check out an Asian market. 


Trust us—cooking with fresh turmeric root is totally worth it.

 

Benefit Two: Soothing Inflammation


Now, let’s move on to the health benefits of turmeric. First things first, we have to discuss one of the main attractions of this ingredient: its anti-inflammatory properties.


Inflammation is the mechanism the body uses to fight foreign invaders, like bacteria, viruses, or toxins. The body’s white blood cells spring into action against these unwanted intruders to protect you against harm. 


However, sometimes, the immune system mistakes its own cells for a threat, triggering inflammation against itself. When this is the case, inflammation can be a serious health hazard. Chronic inflammation has been linked to health issues like cancer, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Yikes.


So, taking small steps to reduce inflammation is really important. This is where turmeric root can really help you out. You can reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of turmeric by chewing on the root or taking a supplement. Or, if you prefer, you could even drink it in the form of turmeric tea. 


But wait—there’s more. The anti-inflammatory powers of turmeric are amazing for skincare, too. Using turmeric on the skin may reduce skin inflammation and the redness, itchiness, and swelling that may come with it.

 

Benefit Three: Fighting Indigestion 


One study
from the University of Maryland Medical Center showed that turmeric promotes the release of bile from the gallbladder. For all the non-doctors out there, this means that turmeric helps the body digest fatty nutrients. In other words, consuming turmeric may reduce indigestion and other gastrointestinal issues. 


So, if you’re experiencing an upset stomach, try chewing on some turmeric root. It can’t hurt, and it might just leave you feeling a lot better.

 

Benefit Three: Battling Acne


This is another reason that
turmeric is so widely used in skincare: it’s great for reducing and preventing acne. 


Along with having anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric also has antibacterial properties. Both of these qualities make it an excellent substance for acne treatment. 


Acne forms when bacteria gets into the pores and starts causing problems. That is why antibacterial substances like both turmeric root and turmeric powder help treat acne—they kill off that harmful bacteria and prevent it from spreading any further.


Likewise, turmeric may reduce inflammation associated with acne. It is truly an all-in-one superfood.


To take advantage of this anti-acne power, try consuming turmeric tea or supplements orally or applying it directly to the skin in the form of a face mask (like our Vitamin C Clay Mask—just a thought).

 

Benefit Four: Reducing Signs of Aging 


Turmeric is basically anti-everything, with -inflammatory, -bacterial, and -oxidant all included on that list. 


Turmeric gets its anti-aging properties from its main ingredient, curcumin, which is a powerful antioxidant. As such, it fights free radicals, which are highly reactive atoms that have the potential to harm the body’s other cells. 


Free radical damage often contributes to skin aging (among other issues). As such, turmeric’s strength as an antioxidant helps us slow signs of aging like wrinkles, fine lines, and more. It also boosts the skin’s elasticity to give your face a youthful, healthy look.

 

Benefit Five: Major Skin Brightening 


Finally, turmeric can do some wonders for your overall complexion. Thanks to all those antioxidants, using turmeric directly on your skin can increase overall brightness and bring out that gorgeous glow that you’re striving for. It can work against hyperpigmentation and scarring, leaving you with smooth, even skin. 


Plus, it doesn’t hurt that applying turmeric as a face mask is a fun, relaxing activity—it’s an all-around win!

 

Closing Comments on Turmeric Root 


It’s pretty clear that turmeric is truly spectacular. It’s hard to believe that a single plant could bring us so many health, skincare, and culinary uses. 


Whether you choose to chew on turmeric root, consume it as a supplement, or incorporate it into your skincare routine, it’s pretty much guaranteed that you’ll be enjoying one (or many) of these awesome benefits.


Finally, although there has been plenty of research done on turmeric already, we just can’t wait to find out what else this stuff can do. 

 

Sources


Turmeric vs Curcumin: Which Should You Take? | Healthline


Why Fresh Turmeric Is Spicier, Sunnier, and Just Plain Better Than Dried | Epicurious 


Inflammation: Definition, Diseases, Types, and Treatment | WebMD


What Are the Benefits of Chewing Turmeric Root? | Healthy Eating 

Return to Blog
5 Benefits From Fresh Turmeric Root

Ingredients

5 Benefits From Fresh Turmeric Root

If you’ve ever walked down the spice aisle of an average grocery store, it’s likely that you’ve seen turmeric, the vivid-orange powdered spice, sitting on the shelves. If you’re ever cooked with it, you probably know just have delicious it can be (and just how much it can stain your dishes that beautiful bright color). But before it takes its place in your spice cabinet or crisper (if you’re using the root), where does turmeric come from? And what can it do for you? 


Let’s break down this magical spice and see what it can do for you—get ready to learn about nature’s gold. 

 

What Is Turmeric?


Turmeric, also known by the scientific name
Curcuma longa, is a flowering plant native to South Asia. It belongs to the ginger family, Zingiberaceae. Like ginger, the root (or rhizome, if you want to get fancy) of turmeric is often used in cooking.


While turmeric root is viable for consumption in its own right, turmeric also takes a different, more common form: powder. If you’re vaguely familiar with turmeric as a culinary ingredient, you probably know it in this form—a deep orange powdered spice.


Turmeric powder comes directly from turmeric root. To make the powder, the roots must be boiled in water, dried, and ground into that fine, brightly-colored dust found on so many spice racks. This flavorful powder has a warm, bitter taste, and it’s often added to dishes like curry powder, mustard, cheese, and butter.


While both raw turmeric root and turmeric powder are popular in the culinary world, they play a vital role in other realms, too. More specifically, people use turmeric in the fields of medicine, fabric-dyeing, and skincare. It’s truly a versatile gift to humankind.

 

Turmeric Contains Curcumin


Clearly, the vivid color and flavorful taste of turmeric aren’t the only perks it has to offer. Turmeric is widely used in medicine and skincare because it’s packed full of really good stuff. 


Curcumin, the most prominent active element in turmeric, gives turmeric strong antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties (along with its unique color and taste). These properties are the reason that turmeric is so popular in skincare and beauty—it does amazing things for the skin.


At this point, you may be asking one question: what’s the difference between turmeric root and turmeric powder? Are both forms of turmeric equally beneficial for us? In short, yes—both substances contain Curcumin, which means they both possess those antioxidant, anti-inflammatory abilities.


However, because turmeric is just so versatile and multi-functional, we’re going to focus on just one of its forms: the root. Let’s explore all of the most compelling benefits of fresh turmeric root and the many ways you should take advantage of this potent superfood. 

###CTA###

Benefit One: Adding Flavor 


Let’s begin with one of the most obvious uses of turmeric—adding a delicious flavor to all sorts of dishes. 


Both turmeric powder and fresh turmeric root will add mustardy, gingery taste to any dish, like curry blends. However, turmeric root seems to have the powder beat when it comes to taste. It offers a brighter, stronger flavor than the powdered turmeric from the spice aisle. 


If you’re looking to really emphasize that turmeric flavor in the next meal you prepare, you may want to opt for fresh turmeric root. It’s usually found right next to the ginger in the produce section. If you can’t find it at your regular spot, check out an Asian market. 


Trust us—cooking with fresh turmeric root is totally worth it.

 

Benefit Two: Soothing Inflammation


Now, let’s move on to the health benefits of turmeric. First things first, we have to discuss one of the main attractions of this ingredient: its anti-inflammatory properties.


Inflammation is the mechanism the body uses to fight foreign invaders, like bacteria, viruses, or toxins. The body’s white blood cells spring into action against these unwanted intruders to protect you against harm. 


However, sometimes, the immune system mistakes its own cells for a threat, triggering inflammation against itself. When this is the case, inflammation can be a serious health hazard. Chronic inflammation has been linked to health issues like cancer, diabetes, asthma, and heart disease. Yikes.


So, taking small steps to reduce inflammation is really important. This is where turmeric root can really help you out. You can reap the anti-inflammatory benefits of turmeric by chewing on the root or taking a supplement. Or, if you prefer, you could even drink it in the form of turmeric tea. 


But wait—there’s more. The anti-inflammatory powers of turmeric are amazing for skincare, too. Using turmeric on the skin may reduce skin inflammation and the redness, itchiness, and swelling that may come with it.

 

Benefit Three: Fighting Indigestion 


One study
from the University of Maryland Medical Center showed that turmeric promotes the release of bile from the gallbladder. For all the non-doctors out there, this means that turmeric helps the body digest fatty nutrients. In other words, consuming turmeric may reduce indigestion and other gastrointestinal issues. 


So, if you’re experiencing an upset stomach, try chewing on some turmeric root. It can’t hurt, and it might just leave you feeling a lot better.

 

Benefit Three: Battling Acne


This is another reason that
turmeric is so widely used in skincare: it’s great for reducing and preventing acne. 


Along with having anti-inflammatory properties, turmeric also has antibacterial properties. Both of these qualities make it an excellent substance for acne treatment. 


Acne forms when bacteria gets into the pores and starts causing problems. That is why antibacterial substances like both turmeric root and turmeric powder help treat acne—they kill off that harmful bacteria and prevent it from spreading any further.


Likewise, turmeric may reduce inflammation associated with acne. It is truly an all-in-one superfood.


To take advantage of this anti-acne power, try consuming turmeric tea or supplements orally or applying it directly to the skin in the form of a face mask (like our Vitamin C Clay Mask—just a thought).

 

Benefit Four: Reducing Signs of Aging 


Turmeric is basically anti-everything, with -inflammatory, -bacterial, and -oxidant all included on that list. 


Turmeric gets its anti-aging properties from its main ingredient, curcumin, which is a powerful antioxidant. As such, it fights free radicals, which are highly reactive atoms that have the potential to harm the body’s other cells. 


Free radical damage often contributes to skin aging (among other issues). As such, turmeric’s strength as an antioxidant helps us slow signs of aging like wrinkles, fine lines, and more. It also boosts the skin’s elasticity to give your face a youthful, healthy look.

 

Benefit Five: Major Skin Brightening 


Finally, turmeric can do some wonders for your overall complexion. Thanks to all those antioxidants, using turmeric directly on your skin can increase overall brightness and bring out that gorgeous glow that you’re striving for. It can work against hyperpigmentation and scarring, leaving you with smooth, even skin. 


Plus, it doesn’t hurt that applying turmeric as a face mask is a fun, relaxing activity—it’s an all-around win!

 

Closing Comments on Turmeric Root 


It’s pretty clear that turmeric is truly spectacular. It’s hard to believe that a single plant could bring us so many health, skincare, and culinary uses. 


Whether you choose to chew on turmeric root, consume it as a supplement, or incorporate it into your skincare routine, it’s pretty much guaranteed that you’ll be enjoying one (or many) of these awesome benefits.


Finally, although there has been plenty of research done on turmeric already, we just can’t wait to find out what else this stuff can do. 

 

Sources


Turmeric vs Curcumin: Which Should You Take? | Healthline


Why Fresh Turmeric Is Spicier, Sunnier, and Just Plain Better Than Dried | Epicurious 


Inflammation: Definition, Diseases, Types, and Treatment | WebMD


What Are the Benefits of Chewing Turmeric Root? | Healthy Eating 

Return to Blog