Dark Spot Remover: The Treatment You Deserve

Dark Spot Remover: The Treatment You Deserve

We’re not exaggerating when we say there are tons of dark spot removers out there on the market. Many of us are in the same boat— we’ve been searching for years, trying all sorts of concealers, on our relentless search to remove those dreaded dark spots from our delicate skin. 


Instead of spending untold amounts of money on concoctions that may or may not work, let’s talk about what’s really going on with your skin, any dark spots that have appeared, and what you can do to clear up and beautify your skin. Hint: These tips and tricks are all-natural from your best beauty guru, Mother Nature.

 

Hyperpigmentation

 

Although usually a harmless condition, hyperpigmentation affects women around the globe of all ages and races. The main symptom of this condition is where patches of your skin become darker than the surrounding skin. 


This is because that particular patch of skin has an excess of melanin, which is used to give skin cells their normal color. But, when excess deposits happen, the color darkens. These spots are also known as age spots, sunspots, liver spots, melasma, and a few other nicknames.

 

What Causes Dark Spots?

 

So, what causes these spots? These unwanted visitors can be a result of sun exposure, hormonal changes, acne, or other skin trauma. If you’re the type of person who picks at your zits, that can also cause scarring or hyperpigmentation in the future. 


Sun exposure is the most prevalent cause of dark spots, which is why they’re known as sunspots. While the sun does make us feel good and, in moderation, can be good for you by being a source of vitamin D, it can also be harmful if you leave yourself unprotected from its damaging rays. Sunlight triggers melanin production, which isn’t always a bad thing.

 

Melanin helps protect your skin from the harmful effects of the sun’s UV rays. However, too much sun can overwhelm your skin’s natural protection. Excessive sun exposure can cause discolorations on your skin that you may want to cover up. 


Plus, once those spots have developed, even more sun exposure can make the spots worse, either by increasing the number of sunspots and their size, or by possibly compounding UV damage into skin cancer. We definitely don’t want that!

 

What Do Dark Spots Look Like?

 

Sunspots are usually brown in color and flat in nature. These spots appear on your skin as a result of sun exposure. Because the UV rays contain radiation, they cause our pigmented skin cells (known as melanocytes) to increase in number. 


Sunspots can be of all different sizes and shapes, but if you notice them grow or rise up from the skin, talk to your doctor. Though they’re most often seen in people with especially fair skin who are over the age of 40, they can appear on anyone.

 

As we age, our melanocytes decrease in number, but the ones we already have get bigger and more concentrated. That’s why it’s usually people over 40 who notice a major increase in age spots. 


Before you spend more time and money on expensive treatments, let’s cover how to prevent getting sunspots in the first place and then what to do when you already have them and are tired of coming face to face with them in the mirror.

 

What You Can Do To Prevent More Dark Spots

 

Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! Shall we say it again? No matter how long you’re planning to be outside, you need wear sunscreen to protect that beautiful skin of yours. When you leave your house, you already know to mask up for the pandemic, so just think of this as an added step.

 

Even if it’s raining or cloudy outside, lather up anyway. UV rays that cause skin damage don’t care about the weather. It’s also important to remember that water amplifies UV rays, so swimming won’t protect you from the sun’s rays either. If you’re heading to the pool, remember to reapply your sunscreen often as well.

 

Have naturally dark skin? Unfortunately, you’re not immune to dark spots. More pigmentation in your skin cells doesn’t stop UV rays. 


Besides sunscreen, you can protect yourself by wearing wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, and lightweight clothing that covers your arms and legs. If possible, it’s always best to try to avoid direct sunlight between 10 AM and 3 PM when the sun is at its strongest.  


Taking any medications? If so, keep in mind that some medications make your skin more sensitive to the sunlight. Be sure to always ask your doctor how your medication regimen will affect your response to sun exposure.

 

Dark Spot Risks 

 

Luckily, most dark spots don’t pose any real threats! However, if you’re worried about a sunspot, contact your doctor to ensure it’s a skin discoloration rather than a more serious issue. 


If you notice that any of your sunspots has gotten darker, larger, or has changed in color, seek advice from a medical professional immediately. Both at-home and professional skin treatments are generally considered safe, but it’s always best to ask questions and be safe rather than sorry!

 

Products And Home Remedies You Can Use 

 

Vitamins: 


Say hello to vitamins A, C, and E! Each of these helpers has been acknowledged by skincare experts as helpful in reducing the appearance of dark spots on the skin. And how do they do this? 


Well, first, vitamin C can help inhibit the enzyme tyrosinase, which prevents the production of melanin. Then we have vitamin E, which can help protect against sun damage, especially when combined with vitamin C. 


Last (but not least), vitamin A may help reverse the appearance of sun damage and lighten dark spots on the skin, such as sunspots. This is a powerful trio of vitamins you want to take full advantage of when it comes to reducing or eliminating dark skin spots.


Turmeric:

 

Turmeric is another great helper when it comes to helping repair any UV damage your skin has sustained and give your skin that svelte, radiant glow that we all crave! 


Not sure what turmeric is? It’s a bright orange-yellow spice related to ginger that is commonly used in curry. It helps improve your skin’s resistance to the sun’s rays to stop skin damage and spotting from occurring in the first place.

 

Another major player in the reducing dark spots game is the active compound curcumin, which is present in turmeric. It has antioxidant properties to keep your skin looking bright and healthy by reducing the production of melanin, which evens out your skin tone and lightens dark spots.

 

Other Ingredients:


There is also some talk about a few other key players out there that can help reduce or lighten the appearance of dark spots on your beautiful skin. You can also enlist the help of:

 

  • Licorice extract - This extract may also help with lightening sunspots and other skin discolorations if used properly.

 

  • Apple cider vinegar – This compound contains acetic acid, which can improve the overall appearance of your skin and smooth out your complexion.

 

  • Green tea bags Some people have recommended green tea bags or their extract to help fade or lighten the appearance of sunspots and other skin discolorations.

 

  • Black tea water - In the same vein, black tea water may also have a lightening effect on skin spots when applied twice daily.

 

  • Lactic acid - Some researchers believe that studying the effects of lactic acid may lead to major strides in lightening sunspots as well.

 

  • Aloe vera – Aloe vera works to soothe the skin, especially when sunburn is present. Some studies have shown that aloe plants contain active compounds, which can lighten sunspots as well. Acemannan is one of the active ingredients in aloe, which suppresses inflammation, but it also blocks tyrosinase, which can lead to dark spots and skin discoloration.

 

  • Lemon juice – This little home remedy has been a fan favorite for years when people are looking to lighten skin spots. Many skin lightening creams contain lemon juice as well.

 

Face Masks:


Looking for more ways to prevent or remove your dark skin spots? Many people turn to face masks, which often have powerful antioxidants that enhance your skin and protect against future sunspots. Being proactive is always key. 


Face masks with vitamin C offer a large array of benefits for anyone looking to reduce dark spots that pop up on the face. Luckily, Gleamin offers a face mask that incorporates a lot more than just clay and vitamin C. This mask evens out your complexion and improves the rate of cell regeneration, so your face can replace cells damaged by sun exposure with healthy new ones. 

 

Face masks are quick and easy to use, and this one is no exception. You simply apply it to a freshly cleansed face, let it sit for the allotted time, rinse with warm water, and pat dry. Just remember, this amazing face mask is a preventative measure against dark spots, but it is not a replacement for sunscreen.

 

In Summary

 

And there you have it – dark spots are not only preventable, but they can also be reduced if you already have some. While the treatments listed above can be effective depending on your skin type and the extent of the damage, they are still home remedies. 


If you’re looking for a treatment that can completely remove dark skin spots, you may end up turning to professional medical treatments. Treatments can vary in price based on location and the severity of the dark spots you’re looking to reduce. Talk to your doctor or dermatologist before seeking more complicated treatments like laser resurfacing or chemical peels.

 

In the end, dark spots on the skin are usually a harmless but unsightly condition. We certainly don’t blame you for wanting to get rid of them. Be proactive, and remember that the best thing you can do is wear sunscreen whenever you’re stepping out into the sun to protect your skin. 

 

An all-natural face mask as a great first step to help lighten your hyperpigmentation. When it comes to dark spots on your skin, there’s no shame in getting creative when it comes to helping them disappear. 

 

Sources

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/sunspots-on-face

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663177/

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-2494.2008.00432.x

Return to Blog
Dark Spot Remover: The Treatment You Deserve

Dark Spot Remover: The Treatment You Deserve

We’re not exaggerating when we say there are tons of dark spot removers out there on the market. Many of us are in the same boat— we’ve been searching for years, trying all sorts of concealers, on our relentless search to remove those dreaded dark spots from our delicate skin. 


Instead of spending untold amounts of money on concoctions that may or may not work, let’s talk about what’s really going on with your skin, any dark spots that have appeared, and what you can do to clear up and beautify your skin. Hint: These tips and tricks are all-natural from your best beauty guru, Mother Nature.

 

Hyperpigmentation

 

Although usually a harmless condition, hyperpigmentation affects women around the globe of all ages and races. The main symptom of this condition is where patches of your skin become darker than the surrounding skin. 


This is because that particular patch of skin has an excess of melanin, which is used to give skin cells their normal color. But, when excess deposits happen, the color darkens. These spots are also known as age spots, sunspots, liver spots, melasma, and a few other nicknames.

 

What Causes Dark Spots?

 

So, what causes these spots? These unwanted visitors can be a result of sun exposure, hormonal changes, acne, or other skin trauma. If you’re the type of person who picks at your zits, that can also cause scarring or hyperpigmentation in the future. 


Sun exposure is the most prevalent cause of dark spots, which is why they’re known as sunspots. While the sun does make us feel good and, in moderation, can be good for you by being a source of vitamin D, it can also be harmful if you leave yourself unprotected from its damaging rays. Sunlight triggers melanin production, which isn’t always a bad thing.

 

Melanin helps protect your skin from the harmful effects of the sun’s UV rays. However, too much sun can overwhelm your skin’s natural protection. Excessive sun exposure can cause discolorations on your skin that you may want to cover up. 


Plus, once those spots have developed, even more sun exposure can make the spots worse, either by increasing the number of sunspots and their size, or by possibly compounding UV damage into skin cancer. We definitely don’t want that!

 

What Do Dark Spots Look Like?

 

Sunspots are usually brown in color and flat in nature. These spots appear on your skin as a result of sun exposure. Because the UV rays contain radiation, they cause our pigmented skin cells (known as melanocytes) to increase in number. 


Sunspots can be of all different sizes and shapes, but if you notice them grow or rise up from the skin, talk to your doctor. Though they’re most often seen in people with especially fair skin who are over the age of 40, they can appear on anyone.

 

As we age, our melanocytes decrease in number, but the ones we already have get bigger and more concentrated. That’s why it’s usually people over 40 who notice a major increase in age spots. 


Before you spend more time and money on expensive treatments, let’s cover how to prevent getting sunspots in the first place and then what to do when you already have them and are tired of coming face to face with them in the mirror.

 

What You Can Do To Prevent More Dark Spots

 

Sunscreen, sunscreen, sunscreen! Shall we say it again? No matter how long you’re planning to be outside, you need wear sunscreen to protect that beautiful skin of yours. When you leave your house, you already know to mask up for the pandemic, so just think of this as an added step.

 

Even if it’s raining or cloudy outside, lather up anyway. UV rays that cause skin damage don’t care about the weather. It’s also important to remember that water amplifies UV rays, so swimming won’t protect you from the sun’s rays either. If you’re heading to the pool, remember to reapply your sunscreen often as well.

 

Have naturally dark skin? Unfortunately, you’re not immune to dark spots. More pigmentation in your skin cells doesn’t stop UV rays. 


Besides sunscreen, you can protect yourself by wearing wide-brimmed hats, sunglasses, and lightweight clothing that covers your arms and legs. If possible, it’s always best to try to avoid direct sunlight between 10 AM and 3 PM when the sun is at its strongest.  


Taking any medications? If so, keep in mind that some medications make your skin more sensitive to the sunlight. Be sure to always ask your doctor how your medication regimen will affect your response to sun exposure.

 

Dark Spot Risks 

 

Luckily, most dark spots don’t pose any real threats! However, if you’re worried about a sunspot, contact your doctor to ensure it’s a skin discoloration rather than a more serious issue. 


If you notice that any of your sunspots has gotten darker, larger, or has changed in color, seek advice from a medical professional immediately. Both at-home and professional skin treatments are generally considered safe, but it’s always best to ask questions and be safe rather than sorry!

 

Products And Home Remedies You Can Use 

 

Vitamins: 


Say hello to vitamins A, C, and E! Each of these helpers has been acknowledged by skincare experts as helpful in reducing the appearance of dark spots on the skin. And how do they do this? 


Well, first, vitamin C can help inhibit the enzyme tyrosinase, which prevents the production of melanin. Then we have vitamin E, which can help protect against sun damage, especially when combined with vitamin C. 


Last (but not least), vitamin A may help reverse the appearance of sun damage and lighten dark spots on the skin, such as sunspots. This is a powerful trio of vitamins you want to take full advantage of when it comes to reducing or eliminating dark skin spots.


Turmeric:

 

Turmeric is another great helper when it comes to helping repair any UV damage your skin has sustained and give your skin that svelte, radiant glow that we all crave! 


Not sure what turmeric is? It’s a bright orange-yellow spice related to ginger that is commonly used in curry. It helps improve your skin’s resistance to the sun’s rays to stop skin damage and spotting from occurring in the first place.

 

Another major player in the reducing dark spots game is the active compound curcumin, which is present in turmeric. It has antioxidant properties to keep your skin looking bright and healthy by reducing the production of melanin, which evens out your skin tone and lightens dark spots.

 

Other Ingredients:


There is also some talk about a few other key players out there that can help reduce or lighten the appearance of dark spots on your beautiful skin. You can also enlist the help of:

 

  • Licorice extract - This extract may also help with lightening sunspots and other skin discolorations if used properly.

 

  • Apple cider vinegar – This compound contains acetic acid, which can improve the overall appearance of your skin and smooth out your complexion.

 

  • Green tea bags Some people have recommended green tea bags or their extract to help fade or lighten the appearance of sunspots and other skin discolorations.

 

  • Black tea water - In the same vein, black tea water may also have a lightening effect on skin spots when applied twice daily.

 

  • Lactic acid - Some researchers believe that studying the effects of lactic acid may lead to major strides in lightening sunspots as well.

 

  • Aloe vera – Aloe vera works to soothe the skin, especially when sunburn is present. Some studies have shown that aloe plants contain active compounds, which can lighten sunspots as well. Acemannan is one of the active ingredients in aloe, which suppresses inflammation, but it also blocks tyrosinase, which can lead to dark spots and skin discoloration.

 

  • Lemon juice – This little home remedy has been a fan favorite for years when people are looking to lighten skin spots. Many skin lightening creams contain lemon juice as well.

 

Face Masks:


Looking for more ways to prevent or remove your dark skin spots? Many people turn to face masks, which often have powerful antioxidants that enhance your skin and protect against future sunspots. Being proactive is always key. 


Face masks with vitamin C offer a large array of benefits for anyone looking to reduce dark spots that pop up on the face. Luckily, Gleamin offers a face mask that incorporates a lot more than just clay and vitamin C. This mask evens out your complexion and improves the rate of cell regeneration, so your face can replace cells damaged by sun exposure with healthy new ones. 

 

Face masks are quick and easy to use, and this one is no exception. You simply apply it to a freshly cleansed face, let it sit for the allotted time, rinse with warm water, and pat dry. Just remember, this amazing face mask is a preventative measure against dark spots, but it is not a replacement for sunscreen.

 

In Summary

 

And there you have it – dark spots are not only preventable, but they can also be reduced if you already have some. While the treatments listed above can be effective depending on your skin type and the extent of the damage, they are still home remedies. 


If you’re looking for a treatment that can completely remove dark skin spots, you may end up turning to professional medical treatments. Treatments can vary in price based on location and the severity of the dark spots you’re looking to reduce. Talk to your doctor or dermatologist before seeking more complicated treatments like laser resurfacing or chemical peels.

 

In the end, dark spots on the skin are usually a harmless but unsightly condition. We certainly don’t blame you for wanting to get rid of them. Be proactive, and remember that the best thing you can do is wear sunscreen whenever you’re stepping out into the sun to protect your skin. 

 

An all-natural face mask as a great first step to help lighten your hyperpigmentation. When it comes to dark spots on your skin, there’s no shame in getting creative when it comes to helping them disappear. 

 

Sources

 

https://www.healthline.com/health/sunspots-on-face

 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3663177/

 

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/abs/10.1111/j.1468-2494.2008.00432.x

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